Pammēteiran

42903361_m

Γαῖαν παμμήτειραν ἀείσομαι, ἠϋθέμεθλον,
πρεσβίστην, ἣ φέρβει ἐπὶ χθονὶ πάνθ’ ὁπόσ’ ἐστίν,
ἠμὲν ὅσα χθόνα δῖαν ἐπέρχεται ἠδ’ ὅσα πόντον
ἠδ’ ὅσα πωτῶνται, τάδε φέρβεται ἐκ σέθεν ὄλβου.
ἐκ σέο δ’ εὔπαιδές τε καὶ εὔκαρποι τελέθουσι,
πότνια, σεῦ δ’ ἔχεται δοῦναι βίον ἠδ’ ἀφελέσθαι
θνητοῖς ἀνθρώποισιν: ὃ δ’ ὄλβιος, ὅν κε σὺ θυμῷ
πρόφρων τιμήσῃς: τῷ τ᾽ ἄφθονα πάντα πάρεστιν·
βρίθει μέν σφιν ἄρουρα φερέσβιος, ἠδὲ κατ᾽ ἀγροὺς
κτήνεσιν εὐθηνεῖ, οἶκος δ’ ἐμπίμπλαται ἐσθλῶν·
αὐτοὶ δ’ εὐνομίῃσι πόλιν κάτα καλλιγύναικα
κοιρανέουσ’, ὄλβος δὲ πολὺς καὶ πλοῦτος ὀπηδεῖ·
παῖδες δ’ εὐφροσύνῃ νεοθηλέϊ κυδιόωσιν,
παρθενικαί τε χοροῖς φερεσανθέσιν εὔφρονι θυμῷ
παίζουσαι χαίρουσι κατ’ ἄνθεα μαλθακὰ ποίης,
οὕς κε σὺ τιμήσῃς, σεμνὴ θεά, ἄφθονε δαῖμον.
χαῖρε, θεῶν μήτηρ, ἄλοχ’ Οὐρανοῦ ἀστερόεντος,
πρόφρων δ’ ἀντ’ ᾠδῆς βίοτον θυμήρε’ ὄπαζε·
αὐτὰρ ἐγὼ καὶ σεῖο καὶ ἄλλης μνήσομ’ ἀοιδῆς.
(Homeric Hymns 30)

Of Earth the universal mother I will sing, the firmly grounded, the eldest who nourishes everything there is on the land, both all that moves on the holy land and in the sea and all that flies; they are nourished from your bounty from you they become fertile in children and crops, mistress, and it depends on you to give livelihood or take it away from mortal men. He is fortunate whom your heart favors and privileges, And everything is his in abundance. His plowland is weighed down with its vital produce, in the fields he is prosperous with livestock, and his house is filled with commodities. Such men are lords in communities where law and order prevail and the women are fair, and much fortune and wealth attend them; their sons exult in youthful vigor and good cheer, and their girls in flower-decked dances delight to frolic happily through the soft meadow flowers—so it is with those whom you privilege, august goddess, bounteous deity. I salute you, mother of the gods, consort of starry Heaven: be favorable, and grant comfortable livelihood in return for my singing. And I will take heed both for you and for other singing. (tr. Martin Litchfield West)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s